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A female empowerment comedy that lacks in laughter.

Hello moviegoers! “The Other Woman” finds three unusual female friends with one thing in common: they all are seeing the same man. While I’m all for girl power. The film suffers from it’s weak plot so much so it’s repeated a second and then a third time. The Other Woman (1 sweet potato out of four) Stars: Cameron Diaz, Leslie Mann, Kate Upton, Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, and Nicki Minaj; Director: Nick Cassavetes; Genre: Comedy; Rated: PG-13; Runtime: 109 minutes; Opens: Friday, April 25, 2014.

Carly (Cameron Diaz), a successful lawyer, finally finds a man, Mark, (Nikolaj Coster-Waldau) that she thinks is worthy of settling down with; the only problem is that he is married to Kate (Leslie Mann). Once Carly realizes that Mark is a cheating scumbag, she tries to move on, but Kate won’t let her. Kate forces herself into Carly’s life and the two become the most unlikely of friends. Kate is unable to immediately divorce Mark, but with Carly’s help starts down the path of believing that she deserves better.

The friendship is off to the races, until Kate discovers Carly may still be sleeping with Mark. Unbeknowst to both women, Mark is now cheating on both of them with Amber (Kate Upton), a hot twenty-something whose capabilities don’t seem to extend past the bedroom. Amber becomes friends with both Carly and Kate, and together they begin to formulate their plan to destroy Mark who is now dating yet another woman.

The few laughs the film manages all originate with Leslie Mann who plays the neurotic wife who sadly grasps onto the hope that her marriage can be saved. As a matter of fact, all of the female characters are well-acted and attempt to bring the most out of their characters. Unfortunately, the characters are hollow, the script is weak, and the jokes simply aren’t there.

“The Other Woman” is more of social commentary on the lack of female roles, female-led movies, and the portrayal of women in film than it is a movie. It also suffers from not one, two, but three montages that are entirely unnecessary. It’s sad that talents like Cameron Diaz only option for headlining a film is a blunder such as this. I give “The Other Woman” one sweet potato out of four.

This is A. P. Richardson for moviegoersview and I will see you after the movies at moviegoersview.com